ArtReproductions™ - JULIEN-DAVID LE ROY

ulien David Le Roy
(1724-1803) was a French architect and archaeologist, who engaged in a rivalry with the British James Stuart and Nicholas Revett over who would publish the first professional description of the Acropolis of Athens since an early 1682 work by Antoine Desgodetz. Le Roy succeeded in printing his “Les Ruines des plus beaux Monuments de la Grèce” four years ahead of Stuart and Revett’s “The Antiquities of Athens and Other Monuments of Greece”. Le Roy rushed his book into print in 1758. The good relations between France and the Ottoman Empire helped Le Roy to access the ruins before Stuart; he recruited the finest engravers and architects to produce illustrations. He spent only three months in Athens, compared to three years taken by Stuart and Revett, however he was leading a much larger team of experts. 

 The Collection Rodaχ – Leroy contains five high quality ArtReproductions™ of monumental drawings of Julien David Leroy, with high resolution prints in heavy stock art paper.


TRAVELERS AND CLASSIC ANTIQUITY
Starting in the 15th century, a continuous flow of Western European travelers kept reaching mainland Greece and Easter Mediterranean, then under Ottoman occupation. Their interest was directed in the monuments of Classical Antiquity, fueled by a renewed interest in humanities and archaeology; the trend peaked in the 18th and 19th centuries. 
The travelers were scholars, geographers, architects, archaeologists, even merchants, leaving t a huge wealth of texts and drawings - which today are an invaluable source of information. It is like photojournalism on monuments, artifacts or landscapes lost forever. Their detailed architectural and engineering designs have formed the basis for the development of that were transported and delivered to the West formed the basis for the development of the Νeoclassic movement, essentially functioning like an arc that transports ancient knowledge and ideas into modern times.  
The task of displaying monuments and landscapes at the time usually yielded comparable results in terms of accuracy and information to those of photography. Most iconographers used the kind of Darkroom, known as Camera Obscura. It was an opaque rectangular box with a small hole that let the light pass; on the opposing wall, an image of the space in front of the hole was formed, inverted and symmetrical. They usually placed a flat mirror, which reflected the image right (but still inverted) into a glass window. There they put a paper and then they traced the imaga with a pencil. Thus, the depiction was flawless, like a photograph. 


The Collection Rodaχ – Le Roy contains five high quality ArtReproductions™ of monumental drawings of Julien David Leroy, with high resolution prints in heavy stock art paper.